The Best of Both Worlds: A New Approach to Direct Botanical Printing (Supplies)

Instructor: Jane Dunnewold

The supply list has been provided by the instructor.  If you have any questions, please contact the instructor at dunnewoldj@complexcloth.com.

Supply List

3 pads (36 sheets) 9” x 12” Strathmore cold press watercolor paper

PREPARE 6 sheets the day before the workshop:
Cut or tear each page into 4 pieces. (24 pieces)
Put 1 cup of white vinegar + 1 cup water in a flat, glass dish. Add the pieces of paper one at a time, so they are immersed in the vinegar solution. Soak the paper in the white vinegar bath overnight. (8 hours)
Pour off the vinegar and put the watercolor papers in a Ziplock bag, so they won’t dry out, and bring them with you to the workshop.

IF YOU ARE DRIVING, YOU MIGHT ALSO CONSIDER PUTTING THE VINEGAR SOLUTION IN A FLAT PLASTIC CONTAINER, WITH A TIGHT FITTING LID. (TUPPERWARE TYPE) THEN YOU CAN SOAK THE PAPERS OVERNIGHT IN THE HOTEL. Or bring them in a baggie in your suitcase on the plane.

12 pieces of heavy cardboard cut into rectangles 6” x 7”
cotton string
a box of latex or vinyl gloves. You will need to wear gloves any time you touch chemicals, so bring a whole box.
scissors
notebook and pen
1/2 yard of cotton fabric, the lighter/thinner, the better
1/2 yard of silk habotai or other lightweight silk (I have this for sale if you need it)

Assortment of leaves and flowers:
Obviously flat is good, since you are stacking leaves between pieces of watercolor paper. I’ve had best luck with fresh leaves and not such great luck with very dry leaves. If the leaf is brown it doesn’t have enough moisture left to transfer to the paper. In general, deciduous leaves (from trees that lose their leaves every year) print well. Sometimes leaves don’t print at all. Bring what’s available and we’ll try them all. Dampen paper towels and put the leaves/flowers in large baggies sandwiched between wet towels. I brought numerous leaves from Wisconsin using this system in my suitcase, and it worked pretty well.

IF YOU ARE TRAVELING FROM OUT OF TOWN, AND BRINGING LEAVES IS AWKWARD, WE CAN HARVEST LOCALLY, AND I WILL ALSO HAVE SELECT PLANTS FROM THE FLORIST.

NOTE: If in doubt about a plant’s toxicity, look it up. Lilies of the Valley and Sumac are examples of plants that are poisonous. While we eat the stem of Rhubarb, the leaves can kill you.

Here is one link: http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/earthkind/landscape/poisonous-plants-resources/common-poisonous-plants-and-plant-parts/ And here’s a Pinterest link to pictures, just in case you need them: https://www.pinterest.com/explore/poisonous-plants/?lp=true

Colored art papers: Ten sheets of various colors.
The most important thing is that the paper be the type where the color goes all the way through. NOT PRINTED. If a design or pattern is printed on one side only, it won’t work for our use. I have auditioned numerous papers and here are a few that work, and also where I found them:

  • Dale Rowney art papers come in a huge assortment of colors. I bought mine at the local Jerry’s Artarama, and they are also available online.
  • Canson/MiTientes art papers also work. Large pieces of paper, so more expensive, but they can be cut down.
  • JoAnn and Hobby Lobby both carry a line of papers in the Scrapbooking Aisle under the Core’dinations brand. The company makes lots of printed papers, too, so be sure to choose papers where the color goes all the way through. The 8 1/2” x 11” sheets are .49 and sometimes half off.
  • Construction paper will NOT work for what we are doing. Nor will printed origami paper.

Optional: handmade papers. Rice paper and mulberry paper have worked for me. BE SURE THE PAPER IS ACTUALLY A NATURAL FIBER–COTTON, RICE, MULBERRY– FOR EXAMPLE. AND PRINTED PAPERS DON’T WORK. IF IN DOUBT, LEAVE THIS OUT. YOU WILL STILL HAVE PLENTY TO DO.

Looking forward to a wonderful workshop with you!
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